The Pros And Cons Of Making Biweekly Mortgage Payments

The Pros And Cons Of Making Biweekly Mortgage PaymentsHave you ever considered paying off the mortgage on your home in two biweekly payments rather than one monthly payment? It might seem like this wouldn’t make a difference, but the truth is that biweekly payments really do add up more quickly.

Since there are 52 weeks in a year you will end up making 26 payments in total – which is equal to 13 months rather than 12. This means that your mortgage will be paid off more quickly and you will save money on interest payments in the long run.

This arrangement might be the best for you when it comes to paying off your mortgage quickly and saving money, but it’s important to consider the possible disadvantages before you make the decision.

Cons Of A Biweekly Mortgage Payment

  • Often lenders do not offer biweekly services free of charge. You will be required to pay a registration fee as well as paying biweekly charges.
  • If your budget doesn’t allow the room to pay more toward your mortgage every year, this could be a foolish move. Don’t neglect the importance of having an emergency savings fund or paying your bills.
  • If you have your mortgage payment set up via direct debit from your bank account, taking out a payment every two weeks could catch you out if the funds are not there, especially if you are only paid once per month. This would result in charges for insufficient funds from both your lender and your bank.

Pros Of A Biweekly Mortgage Payment

  • Some people find that paying their mortgage biweekly fits better into their budget because it’s easier to plan for a smaller payment amount – especially if they are paid every two weeks.
  • By shaving years off the length of your mortgage, you are reducing the amount of money you will pay over the long run.
  • You will also be speeding up the time it takes to build equity in your home.
  • You will be compelled to make an extra mortgage payment per year, enforcing good habits on yourself that will eventually pay off.

These are just a few factors to consider before deciding whether you should make biweekly payments on your mortgage. If you don’t want to commit to biweekly payments on your home mortgage, you can always save up your money and make a lump sum payment at the end of the year.

For more tips and advice, feel free to reach out to your trusted mortgage professional today.

The Low Down On The HUD-1 Settlement Statement

The Low Down On HUD1 Settlement StatementWhen preparing for a closing on your refinance or home purchase, one of the documents you will be provided with a few days before closing is a HUD-1 Form. This form provides you with valuable information about your loan.

While at first, this three page document may seem intimidating, if you understand what you see in each section, it is not as confusing as you might think. Let’s break down the various parts of the HUD-1 and talk about what they mean.

Loan Information

On the first page of your HUD1, you will see your loan information at the top. This includes the type of mortgage, property location, loan amount and the date of closing. This information is very basic but also is very important to review for accuracy.

Buyer And Seller Costs

If you are refinancing your home, you will only see information in the buyer section of the HUD-1. This section will define any charges associated directly with the home including taxes, insurance and any amounts that are due from you or payable to you at closing.

You will also see a total of all settlement costs which you can find broken down by category on page two of the HUD-1.

Page 2 Is Important

On the second page of your HUD-1 form, you will see a complete breakdown of all costs associated with your loan. This includes appraisal fees, broker or lender fees, and if your loan is a purchase loan, you will also see information regarding fees paid to a real estate broker if applicable.

Additional information found on this page includes escrow payments the lender may require be paid prior to closing. In most cases, escrow will include a portion of taxes and insurance payments that will be due through the quarter following closing on the mortgage.

Final And Important Highlights Of Page 3

Finally, you will need to review the signature page of your HUD-1 form. This page also contains critical information regarding your loan. Your interest rate, information on whether or not your loan will increase and the total amount you will pay over the life of your loan.

Additionally, you will see a comparison of the fees that you are actually paying compared to what your lender estimated at the type of application.

Borrowers need to review their HUD-1 form thoroughly prior to signing any loan documents. Typically, this form will be provided to a borrower a day or two prior to closing to allow for review and to get any questions answered prior to closing.

Having a basic understanding of the HUD-1 form can help make your closing much less stressful. For further questions on this topic feel free to reach out to your trusted mortgage professional.

10 Questions You Should Ask Yourself Before Applying For A Mortgage: Part 2

10 Questions You Should Ask Yourself Before Applying For A Mortgage Part 2Yesterday you may have read the blog post on questions to ask yourself before applying for a mortgage. Here are 5 additional that you may want to think about before you go into your meeting with your loan officer.

Here are questions 6-10 that you may need to get answers to before completing your application:

6. How Long Until We Can Close Our Loan?

Loan closing times are based on a number of factors. Closing dates may be delayed if there are missing documents or other underwriting delays. Speak with the loan officer to get an estimate on the time from application to closing.

7. What Possible Delays May I Face In Closing?

There are a number of delays that often cannot be avoided. However, some can be avoided by making sure you provide your loan officer with all the documents they request in a timely manner. In some cases, there may be a delay in getting the appraisal completed or for title searches. Your loan officer can discuss other reasons why a delay may occur.

8. Do I Need An Attorney For Closing?

When you are ready to close your loan, you are welcome to have an attorney representing you. Generally, there will be an attorney present at the closing however, they are there to represent the lender. If you feel more comfortable having an attorney present, discuss this with your loan officer to ensure the attorney receives the date, time and location of closing.

9. Should I Lock In My Interest Rate?

Before locking in a rate, make sure it is important to understand there may be fees associated with an interest rate lock. Bear in mind, should rates decline during the period between application and closing you will not be able to take advantage of those lower rates.

10. When Will I Get A HUD1 Statement?

As a borrower, you are entitled to review their HUD1 statement prior to closing. Your loan officer should make arrangements with you to provide the statement one or two days prior to closing for your review. This will give you an opportunity to review loan terms, interest rate and costs of the loan.

Never hesitate to ask your loan officer any questions you may have. The more questions you have addressed during the application process, the less likely you will be to be confused at the time of your mortgage closing.

Keep in mind, your loan officer is there to answer your questions and guide you through the entire loan process.

10 Questions You Should Ask Yourself Before Applying For A Mortgage: Part 1

10 Questions You Should Ask Yourself Before Applying For A Mortgage Part 1If you are considering applying for a refinance, it is important to understand the mechanics of your mortgage loan. Before you sit down to speak with your loan officer, you should consider preparing a list of questions you feel may need to be answered.

Typically, your loan officer will be available to assist through the entire mortgage process. Here are some questions that you may need to get answers to before completing your application:

1. What Type Of Loan Is Best For Me?

Your loan officer can discuss the various loan programs available to help you refinance. Some borrowers will benefit greatly from adjustable rate mortgages while others prefer fixed rate. However, other borrowers may find a fixed rate is the best option. Discuss various loan terms such as 30-year or 20-year mortgage loans.

2. What Documents Are Required?

Be prepared to provide your loan officer with several documents. The most common documents include pay stubs, bank statements and tax returns. Loan officers will also need a complete list of debts including auto payments, credit card payments and student loans.

3. What Costs Are Involved?

Prior to a loan closing you will be required to pay some costs up front. These may include appraisal fees, credit report fees and application fees.

Discuss all these costs with the loan officer to determine how much money will be required prior to the loan being approved. In addition, discuss any funds that will be required to complete the loan closing.

4. Can I Select My Own Appraiser?

When you apply for a refinance loan, lenders will require a property appraisal. Lenders typically maintain a list of approved appraisers and supply those lists to the loan officers. Typically, the loan officer will assign an appraiser to review the property. Borrowers generally have no input regarding the choice of appraisers.

5. When Will I Get A Good Faith Estimate?

Good Faith Estimates must be issued after you have completed your loan application. A second GFE is typically presented along with the HUD1 prior to closing. Keep in mind, the GFE is only an estimate of costs and that actual costs may be slightly higher or lower.

Never hesitate to ask your loan officer any questions you may have. The more questions you have addressed during the application process, the less likely you will be to be confused at the time of your mortgage closing.

Keep in mind, your loan officer is there to answer your questions and guide you through the entire loan process. For additional questions you should ask, check out tomorrow’s blog post.

Recent Government Activity And Its Effect On Mortgage Interest Rates

Recent Government Activity And Its Effect On Mortgage Interest RatesMortgage rates typically are tied more to the yields on the 10-year Treasury note more than any other indicator. With the government in flux as the shutdown happened and ended, mortgage rates are also changing.

Overall, mortgage rates have decreased because of a lack of confidence in the government’s ability to get its finances under control.

Although rates spiked in September when the Fed hinted that they would not be purchasing as many bonds, they quickly released an announcement that they would actually be maintaining their current purchasing habits.

The Time Is Ripe For Homeowners

Since then, mortgage interest rates have been dropping back down to their previous levels. With 30-year and 15-year fixed mortgage rates continuing at very low levels, the time is ripe for homeowners to purchase or refinance.

In the day following the reopening of the government, mortgage rates continued at their low levels, which surprised some economists. The stock market went down and yields on the 10-year Treasury note also decreased, which both suggest a lack of confidence in the government.

Despite their ability to come to an agreement, investors and economists note that it is just a temporary fix, and there will likely be anothershowdown looming. Rates may remain low for a little while, but as the government begins releasing more economic data, mortgage interest rates could increase if the data shows growth in the economy.

Buyers Expect An Increase Of Applications

The government shutdown did have an effect on the volume of applications for government mortgages, like FHA and VA loans. Both reached a six-year low, largely because there were no staff on hand to answer questions over the phone and the offices were running on skeleton crews.

As the offices are back up and running again, buyers are expected to increase their volume of applications because those who had been delaying their applications now need to get the ball rolling on their home purchases.

Amidst all of the uncertainty, one thing is quite clear. It’s unlikely that interest rates will drop significantly lower than they are now, so buyers looking to get a mortgage and homeowners looking to refinance may be best off locking a rate soon rather than waiting.